School Curriculum Under Fire For Teaching Kids How To Hide Porn From Parents

There has been an increasing number of troubling reports regarding sexually explicit material being taught in public school classrooms across the nation in recent years, but one anecdote out of Idaho appears to take that trend to a new level.

The state’s Department of Health and Welfare reportedly put in an order for a new statewide curriculum that teaches grade-school students that there is no shame in consuming pornography — despite the fact that almost everyone in these schools is too young to legally possess such material.

Education, Training and Research, described as a left-leaning nonprofit organization, has produced a series of lessons that address, among other things, “kink and power, pleasure, sexual identity, sexual acts, and sexual exploration in relation to pornography.”

Among the blatantly suggestive videos that accompany the curriculum is a cartoon character who is watching something on a device and says: “Wow! That’s so big. I never knew it could be so huge!”

According to a video compiled by the Idaho Freedom Foundation, the resources included in this curriculum include links to abortion providers and tips about hiding pornographic web searches from parents.

The organization has labeled pornography a “required topic” in education and advises that it is “perfectly normal” for kids to view “pictures or films of naked bodies or people engaging in sexual behaviors.”

Clearly, not everyone agrees. For its part, the IFF has denounced the ETR for promoting “queering education and normalizing the consumption of pornography.”

Conservative writer Christopher Rufo shared the video on Twitter and declared it the latest sign that it is “time to break the state-run education monopoly and provide families with universal school choice.”

Earlier this year, a mother in Oregon spoke out about the explicit depiction of sexual acts in books promoted by the local school district, noting that she removed her child from the public school as a result.

As Kristen Stevens told Fox News: “It’s not about how I feel. It’s about the laws are being broken. Children are being exposed to sexual content at an age that they’re not developmentally ready to be exposed to this. It actually can cause PTSD in a lot of these children.”