Washington State 4-H Program Threatens Competitors Over Pronouns

Radical gender ideology has infiltrated even the traditional American program of 4-H, which is popular in many rural areas of the country. It normally promotes agricultural and farming practices to younger generations in a healthy and attractive manner.

Not anymore, according to a report by the Post Millennial.

Teenage girls participating in the 4-H equestrian competition in Graham, Washington, earlier in August wore matching shirts. The offensive message proclaimed, “My pronoun is nor/mal.” They were purchased from a booth at the Pierce County Fair where the event was held.

The organization is a subdivision of the U.S. Department of Agriculture and represents the largest U.S. youth development organization. Under the Biden administration, however, it apparently succumbed to radical gender ideology.

Critics blasted its policy, “Practices for Inclusion of Individuals of all Genders,” as being counter to free speech protections and parental rights.

The girls at the county fair quickly found that their free speech rights were not recognized by 4-H. They were reportedly approached by Brian Brandt of the Pierce County Extension 4-H without their parents there.

One of the young women, Sydney Smith, said she barely knew Brandt and “he made me feel very uncomfortable when he wanted to talk to me without my parents being there…and I know my friends felt this way too.”

Smith said that when her dad approached, another parent became irate and began yelling at her about the shirt. She was told that she had “no business wearing the shirt and…needed to take it off.”

Her father intervened, telling the belligerent woman that their conversation had nothing to do with her. “She was angry and yelling and I was scared and uncomfortable…She refused to leave and turned her anger on my dad.”

Smith said she hoped 4-H would do something about the woman who kept “lunging” at her father and asking “what are you going to do about it?” Don’t hold your breath.

Later in the day, Brandt reportedly approached parent volunteer Donna Person Smith and asked if she was aware that a picture of the girls and their shirts was posted on Facebook. Smith said he indicated that a pronoun shirt would be “appropriate” if it had pronouns he approved of.

She added that the 4-H official approached the girls not for any rule violation, but simply because he did not approve of the message on their shirts. Smith called it a clear violation of her daughter’s “right to free speech and free expression.”

Brandt demanded that the pictures be removed from Facebook, and they were.

He further claimed that there are federal, state and local laws against harassment. Smith agreed and asked when he and the 4-H organization were going to address the harassment experienced by the girls.

There was no reply.